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Economics Scholarships

Economic degree programs are designed to teach degree candidates how to analyze and interpret economic issue and problems. You'll learn to look at these issues and problems through the lens of economic theory, governmental policy and sociocultural trends. Continue reading to learn more about this major and more about economic scholarships.

Your program will most likely begin with a broad overview of both micro and macroeconomics. As your studies progress you'll take more specific courses that will allow you to apply your broad understanding of economic theory to narrow, real-like issues. The mode of instruction for these courses is most often the traditional lecture format.

Typical core courses encountered in economics degree programs include economic statistics, international trade and finance, the history of economics, poverty and development, industrial organization systems and public policy analysis. Complimenting your core coursework will be a smattering of liberal arts and humanities electives. You'll want to choose your electives wisely for history and social science courses can facilitate the understanding of economics in a wider matrix.

Be certain to carefully examine the economics degree programs you are considering. Some programs emphasize the theoretical while others stress practical analysis of economic systems. Deciding which perspective you want to view economics from will help determine what auxiliary courses you'll need to take. You'll also want to find out what other degree requirements are involved in your program. Internships, Capstone projects and senior thesis projects are often degree requirements.

The career outlook for individuals with a bachelor's degree in economics depends entirely on which direction you choose to go. Some graduates decide to continue their studies at the master's or doctoral level. Here you can specialize in an advanced area of the field such as econometrics or industrial organization. These graduate degrees can lead to careers such as senior research analyst or university professor.

If the bachelor's is your terminal degree you still have plenty of career options. Economics can be the educational pathway for jobs such as business manager, sales manager or economic analyst. You may also find job opportunities in fields such as education, the non-profit sector or public policy.

Explore the links below to continue examining the wide array of economic scholarships.

Appraisal Institute Education Trust Scholarship (Undergraduate & Graduate)

Scholarships for full-time undergraduate and graduate students majoring in real estate appraisal, land economics, real estate, or allied fields. Must be a U.S. Citizen. Selection is based on academic excellence. Eligibility  Applicant must be a student majoring in real estate appraisal, land economics, real estate or allied fields.  Applicant must be a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior seeking an associate or bachelor’s degree.  Applicant must be a Masters Candidate or Doctoral Candidate.  Applicant must be a full or part-time student at a U.S. degree granting college or university.  Applicant must have a strong academic record.  Scholarship award must be used in the same academic year it is awarded.  Eligible recipients may receive only one (1) AIET Scholarship per year. Required  Completed application.  Two-hundred (200) word personal statement discussing academic achievements, financial need, career aspirations, involvement in real estate field, and any qualifications considered relevant by the applicant.  Current Resume (Preference given to applicants with an appraisal internship).  Official copies of all college transcripts.  Two (2) letters of recommendation attesting to applicant’s work ethic, character and pursuit of career in real estate appraisal, land economics, real estate or allied fields. Letters of recommendation should be sent directly to the Appraisal Institute Education Trust.

Eric P. Newman Graduate Seminar in Numismatics

For over half a century the American Numismatic Society, a museum of coins, money and economic history, has offered select graduate students and junior faculty the opportunity to work hands-on with one of the world‘s preeminent numismatic collections. With over three-quarters of a million objects, the museum‘s collection is particularly strong in Greek, Roman, Islamic, and Far Eastern coinages, as well as medallic art. The rigorous eight-week course taught by the museum staff, guest lecturers and a visiting scholar introduces students to the methods, theories and history of the discipline. The seminar is meant primarily for those with limited or no numismatic background in order to familiarize students of (art) history, textual studies, and archaeology with a body of evidence that is often overlooked and poorly understood. Application Instructions for the Applicant: After you have completed the application choose File then Save As 1. In the Save As dialog box choose a location on your computer where you will be able to retrieve the form at a later time. 2. File name: should be Yourlastname-Yourfirstname.pdf 3. Save as type: should be Adobe PDF Files (*.pdf) 4. Then click the Save button. 5. Attach the completed application to an email with the subject application YourFirstName YourLastName and addressed to seminar@numismatics.org

Canadian Studies Graduate Student Fellowship

This program is intended for full-time doctoral students at accredited four-year U.S. and Canadian colleges and universities whose dissertations are related in substantial part to the study of Canada, Canada/U.S. or Canada/North America. Candidates must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States and should have completed all doctoral requirements except the dissertation when they apply for a grant. This grant is not renewable.

Graduate Studies Program

For graduate students who focus primarily on international affairs, languages, economics, geography, cartography, physical sciences and engineering; other majors may be accepted Should be entering their first or second year of graduate studies in an accredited college or university Active participation in projects with potential to have work disseminated throughout the Intelligence Community General Requirements: US citizenship 3.0 GPA or better on a 4.0 scale Foreign language skills and previous international residency are pluses Medical/polygraph examinations and background investigation required Assignments are ONLY in the Washington, DC metro area Because of safety concerns for the prospective applicant, as well as security and communication issues, the CIA Recruitment Center does not accept applications, nor can we return phone calls, e-mails or other forms of communication, from US citizens living outside of the US.

William C. Foster Fellows Visiting Scholars Program

Foster Fellows must be citizens of the United States, on the faculty of a recognized institution of higher learning, and tenured or on a tenure track or equivalent; they also must have served as a permanent career employee of the institution for at least ninety days before selection for the program. The Department of State is an equal opportunity employer. Selections will be made without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or physical handicap that does not interfere with the performance of duties. Prior to appointment, applicants will be subject to a full-field background security investigation for a Top Secret security clearance. Candidates will not be extended a formal offer of appointment until a security clearance has been granted and all other requirements have been met. This procedure can take up to six months. Visiting scholars will also be subject to applicable Federal conflict of interest laws and standards of conduct.

Golden State Minority Foundation Scholarship

The following are the scholarship requirements: - Attend school or be a resident of California - Qualified under-represented ethnic minority (Black, Latino, Native American) - Minimum GPA of 3.0 on 4.0 scale - U.S.A. citizen or permanent legal resident - Currently enrolled as a junior or above in college - Employed no more than 28 hours per week - Full-time status at a four-year college/university - demonstrated community service

Harry S. Truman Scholarships

The Foundation expects to award 75 to 80 Truman Scholarships on the basis of merit to junior-level students at four-year colleges and universities who: - Have extensive records of public and community service; - Are committed to careers in government or elsewhere in public service, and; - Have outstanding leadership potential and communication skills. In addition, up to three residents of Puerto Rico and the Islands with senior-level academic standing will be selected. Scholars are eligible to receive $3,000 for the senior year of undergraduate education and $27,000 for graduate studies. Scholars in master's degree programs planning to receive degrees in one or two years are eligible to receive $13,500 per year. Scholars in law programs are eligible to receive $13,500 at the start of the third year's second semester if they provide evidence that they will enter public service upon graduation or upon completion of any judicial clerkships after graduation. Scholars in graduate programs requiring three or more years of academic study are eligible to receive $9,000 per year for a maximum of three years. Scholars may attend graduate or professional schools in the United States or in foreign countries. One state scholarship will be available to a qualified resident nominee in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and, considered as a single entity, the Islands: Guam, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. (Residency is generally determined by home address for school registration, family's primary residence, and voter registration.) The Foundation will select up to 35 at-large Scholars. Each nominee must be: - A full-time junior-level student at a four-year institution pursuing a bachelor's degree during the upcoming academic year. Junior here means a student who plans to continue full-time undergraduate study and who expects to receive a baccalaureate degree or a student in his or third year of collegiate study who expects to graduate during the upcoming academic year, - Enrolled in an accredited institution of higher education, - Committed to a career in public service as defined above, - In the upper quarter of his or her class, and - A United States citizen or a United States national from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Resident aliens (green card holders) are not eligible. Selection Procedures: A committee examines all nominations and selects about 200 Finalists to be interviewed for Truman Scholarships. Finalists are selected on the basis of: - extent and quality of community service and government involvement; - leadership record; - academic performance and writing and analytical skills, and; - suitability of the nominees's proposed program of study for a career in public service. Priority is given to candidates proposing to enroll in graduate and professional programs specifically oriented to careers in public service. These include law programs and master's and doctorate programs in public administration, public policy analysis, public health, international relations, government, economics, social services delivery, education and human resource development, and conservation and environmental protection.

Horizons Foundation Scholarship Program

Applicants must meet the following criteria: 1. Be currently enrolled at an accredited university or college, either full-time or part-time. Both undergraduate and graduate students are eligible. Undergraduates must have attained at least junior level status (60 credits). 2. Demonstrate interest in pursuing a career related to national security. 3. Demonstrate financial need. 4. Have a minimum Grade Point Average of 3.25. 5. Be a U.S. Citizen. The Foundation focuses on the following preferred fields of study for awarding scholarships: Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, Mathematics, Business, Law, International Relations, Political Science, Operations Research, Economics. Other fields of study will be considered if the applicant can successfully demonstrate relevance to a career in the areas of national security or defense. Recipients of past awards are not restricted from reapplying for future financial assistance.

Byron Hanke Fellowship

Hanke Fellowship applicants must be enrolled in an accredited master's, doctoral or law program. Students of all disciplines are welcome to apply for the Hanke Fellowships, provided their studies relate to community associations generally and to the topic of the candidate's proposed community associations research project. In the past, the CAI-RF has recognized outstanding achievement in the academic study of community associations through the annual CAI Research Foundation Award of Excellence. Papers submitted for this prestigous award have come from a wide range of academic disciplines, including law, economics, sociology, and urban planning. All of these disciplines are appropriate areas of graduate studies for a Hanke Fellowship, along with any others which the Research Foundation may be persuaded are relevant to community associations. Within the field of community associations and common-interest communities, Hanke Fellowship projects may address management, institutions, organization and administration, public policy, architecture, as well as political, economic, social and intellectual trends in community association housing. Projects may focus on either applied or theoretical research. The Research Foundation is especially interested in substantive papers from the social sciences which place community association housing within political or economic organizational models. In all cases, the topic must have the approval of the graduate student's general academic advisor, or of another full-time faculty member, who will supervise the Hanke Fellow's Project. The project topic must have the potential to further understanding of residential community associations.

Arthur H. Cole Grants-in-Aid for Research

The Committee on Research in Economic History (CREH) of the Economic History Association supports research in economic history, regardless of time period or geographic area. CREH Grants-in-Aid typically are in amounts up to $1,500, although higher amounts may be awarded in exceptional cases. Applicants must have completed the Ph.D. and must be members of the Economic History Association. Preference is given to recent Ph.D. recipients.

MAGA Scholarship

You must meet the following qualifications in order to apply for the MAGA scholarship: * Applicant must be a Hispanic student majoring in Business Administration or a business related field such as Finance, Economics, International Business, etc. * A full-time, undergraduate student attending community college or a four-year accredited college or university; Graduate students MAY NOT apply. * Entering at least sophomore year of study. * Have a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average.

Denton Scholarship Award

A gift from Leona Denton, wife of Earl A. Denton, Chicago '29, inaugurated the Denton Scholarship Award. The award annually entails an attractive plaque and grant to a graduating senior or current graduate student in the field of International Affairs with an emphasis in World Trade, Economics, Business, or Political Science.

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